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a different america. >> major burris this leaders on how new york regained a major position. >> with wall street's reemergence, wall street was pulled into the global economy and became america's gateway to that economy, and has prospered ever since. >> watched the interview sunday night on c-span. >> the consumer federation of america have a summit meeting in washington, d.c. this week. the subject of one panel was how communication has changed with the presence of the internet, mobile devices, and social networking. also covered, online privacy. experts from microsoft and a rise in to play -- took part in this one hour, 20 minute event. >> i think we're going to get started for this morning's panel. it is entitled "the future of consumer communications." we're glad to hear your critics see you here on a friday morning. no place better to be at this panel talking about this issue. in recent years, we have seen an explosion in growth of devices that consumers use and the way that the uses them, whether facebook, twitter, video. more and more consumers use devices in different ways to acce
. a public service created by america's cable companies. >> our series of interviews with likely g.o.p. candidates continues with former pennsylvania senator rick santorum. we'll talk to him about his political career. when he began thinking of running for president and why. what issues he thinks are important in the 2010 campaign. states rights and health care. his views on abortion. church views on state. and his views on catholocism. this is about 50 minutes. >> when did you decide you had to get involved? >> the same motor vague as a lot of the tea party people. i thought this was a tipping point. if obama care took over the health care system, america as i was given it, as my grandfather and father came to this country that place would no longer exist. i went out started talking and working on campaigns and helping people around the country and trying to stir people up and provide a message, and i got a lot of feedback saying, hey you should think of doing this again, running for something. just again, kept walking down the path. i found out by th
. main street, not wall street. this is not about my past. it is about our future. i think america is in trouble. the debt is amounting, and is resting on the chests of my grandchildn. spending is out of control. we spend $300 billion of month, and we'd borrow $120 billion of that. we've borrowed from our enemies or our competitors -- china, japan, and the tyrants in the middle east. the is no end in sight, and the president's own budget, he has got to in years of deficit. he will add more to the national debt in his four years than all presidts or him combine. what is washington doing? thank god for the tea party. i noticed -- [applause] thank god for paul ryan and the republican party and steve king and others. washington is not about leadership. washington is not about the people. washington is about money and reelection. had he figured it out? -- have you figured it out? i will tell you a story, the nation is hurting, and washington, d.c., is a boom town. how does that grab you? i tell you what they are addicted to. special interest money, all i want is access money, wall stree
. if the government took over the health care system, america as we know it, as i was given it, as my grandfather who came to this country that place would no longer exists. so i just went out and started talking and working on campaigns and talking to people around the country and trying to stir people up and provide a message and a lot of feedback. you should think about doing this again, running for something. i kept walking down the path. i found out, by the way, when i went to iowa we had been in 21 states but when i went to iowa c-span actually covered my speech. other folks started paying attention. they said, "oh you are running for president." i said, "no, i'm just visiting the states." i kept going back to iowa and then new hampshire and south carolina because, every time i did, i got covered. i wanted to be heard. when i did that, was encouraged by people in those states to start thinking about it and that is sort of how this all happened. it was really by accident. >> you were quick to point out you are not a tea party guy. >> i love the tea party but i will not claim the mantle. tea part
backs it up. it is families that are the solution and the ultimate building block for america. because no stimulus, no entitlement reform, no health care initiative, no educational revamp can match the power of an intact, two parent family and driving economic growth health and well being in the united states. [applause] and i come from a family where my parents did divorce. i understand the difficulty and the difficulty that is single parents have. and this is not to den grate them in any way. but it's also to say our government needs to prefer a tax code and a policy that prefers family formation and the building up of families so that children have a safe environment to grow up because no one loves them more than mom and d. no government agency, no government bureaucrat. it's mom and dad. we've been told that we need a truce on social issues and i would highly disagree with that because the truth is social conserveatism is fiscal conserveatism. i mentioned just briefly about the fair tax. i am as a tax lawyer as i told you earl
states of america. and if the european allies and nato cannot manage to pursue this with the same intensity that they have exhibited over the last week, they are likely to call upon the united states to do more and the u.s. will remain part of the coalition. i think that's part of the complexity of this and the contradictions inherit in his policy that the president will have to address this evening. >> nick and david, back with us in a few minutes. how has the coalition military campaign changed the balance of power on the ground in libya? i want to go to the map and look at this. the president does not like the term war when it comes to this. is this a war? is the united states at war? >> well, you talk about war and i think you talk about world war one and i would not use the term "war." the guy on the ground getting shot at, it's like war. >> the president of the united states addresses the american people tonight. i want to close the map and go back here to march 18th. let me close this one down today. this is march 18th. this is the day before it all started. and here's -- y
therefore, the main task of latin america is to recover the lost time and tap all of its potential. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism becau
the obvious. america has to get its fiscal house in order. how we got here is debated but certain things are indisputable. we have two wars that have been paid for on the credit card. we had tax cuts that went to the high income americans that are on the credit card. we recently extended them at the cost of $700 billion to the deficit. we had irresponsible behavior on the part of wall street that required rescuing the financial system in america so that main street could fight and survive another day. and then that led to a collapse in the economy and 10% unemployment that required governmental action in order to try to stabilize the economy. we have a long way to go in restoring the economy, but that has to be our first mission. the republican proposal on how to address this budget in these continuing resolutions will fail. the reason it will fail is because it fails to do what must obviously be done if we're going to have long-term fiscal stability and that is put everything on the table. the cuts that are proposed by the republican majority, unwise as they are, cannot do the job. the
of us will face difficult problems. the question is, will america be the america that it's always been? we do not get our authority by might. we get it by the way we treat each other. and so these folks are going through some difficult times, these are the same people that this loan program is about, these are the same people that showed up time after time, sitting in the front row of something i call my foreclosure prevention program, with tears running down their faces. many of them have never missed a mortgage payment, have worked hard every day and have done everything that was required of them. these are our american neighbors, they are the american neighbors that sit in ohio, they're the ones who are in california and new york. those are our neighbors and they are in a time of need and we're talking about a $1 billion program to try to help people as they're struggling, trying to get up after an economy, by the way, where regulation failed them. they find themselves in these difficulties, in many instances, buzz people were not regulating -- because people were not regulating pro
. this is not about my past. it is about our future. i think america is in trouble. the debt is amounting, and is resting on the chests of my grandchildren. spending is out of control. we spend $300 billion of month, and we'd borrow $120 billion of that. we've borrowed from our enemies or our competitors -- china, japan, and the tyrants in the middle east. there is no end in sight, and the president's own budget, he has got to in years of deficit. he will add more to the national debt in his four years than all presidents or him combine. what is washington doing? thank god for the tea party. i noticed -- [applause] thank god for paul ryan and the republican party and steve king and others. washington is not about leadership. washington is not about the people. washington is about money and reelection. had he figured it out? -- have you figured it out? i will tell you a story, the nation is hurting, and washington, d.c., is a boom town. how does that grab you? i tell you what they are addicted to. special interest money, all i want is access money, wall street money, to be to fail money. u
is a mean-spirited bill that will cut the heart out of the recovery we have in america today. it goes after little children, poor little boys and girls who want to learn -- they don't know what they want, but we want them to learn to read, to be able to learn something. head start is a program that has been successful. we have a lot of poor people in nevada. i wish we didn't but we do. head start has been something that has been great for our community. national institutes of health, they're whacking of that. national science foundation. our clean energy jobs, they're going after that. national laboratories. where is the spirit of pete domenici? pete domenici, longtime republican senator, he and i worked as chair and ranking member of the energy and water subcommittee on appropriations trying to fund those very important labs. the labs do lots of good things. among other things, they make our country, nuclear weapons safe and reliable. what has been done with this meat ax approach that they say is only numbers is not good for our country. i've heard my friend, the assistant majority leader,
standing for the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god indivisible with liberty and justice for all. thank you. you may be seated. we have a great lineup for you this morning. before we get to that, i have a few programming notes. you've got a program when you came in today. it reads from left to right in order of the speakers. we do have a little change in the program. senator rick santorum could not be here today. he sent his regrets. he did everything he could to be here. after the family values panel we will adjourn for a one hour lunch break. lunch will be a $10 a box lunch available to you right outside where you registered. you can try to navigate through the sky walk in beautiful downtown des moines. we will reconvene one hour after that. one last thing. this is a little important. turn off cell phones or put them in silenct mode. i am the director of the conservative principles pac congressman steve king's leadership back. pac. it is my honor to introduce this mornin
in america and also around the globe. coming up for you, violence escalates in ivory coast as militias loyal to the two presidential rivals hunt down their opponents. and an historic touchdown for discovery. the oldest of america's space shuttles. and its remarkable 27-year career. bbc team in libya have been jailed and subjected to beatings and mock executions. the events took place when they were detained early they are week but only now that they have left the country are we reporting their story. while they were in prison they witnessed first hand the horrifying levels of violence meted out by colonel gaddafi's security forces and other prisoners. the bbc team were teasted at a rest point six miles south of zawiya where some of the feesest fighting is taking place. after their release they spoke to our middle east editor jeremy bowen in tripoli. >> 30 miles and many checkpoints separate zawiya from tripoli. the town has been sealed off. tonight, the gaddafi forces seemed close to victory there. but we can't firm that because the libyans won't let foreign news teams move freely. the bbc l
are expected at five bucks in this summer. how are we going to move people? how are we going to build america? how are going to put people back to work in less you a robust funding stream in the transportation sector. and if you don't do that -- [applause] >> and if you don't do that, you know, you're going to get what you get and you're going to limp along and you going to continue to see people being laid off from transit systems all across the country. you're going to continue to see rolling stock to carry. you will continue to see things not in a state of good repair. you can change that during this visit on the hill. and people need to understand when you visit with them that this really matters. a lot of us, we talk of a 30,000-foot level, the deficit is a trillion and a half dollars. the debt is debt. let's talk about what affects everybody every day when we get up and we have to forget whether to go to work how they will get to work, or whether they will have a job, whether they will be up to feed and clothe their families. i think of a good message if you choose to exercise, if you s
. at this point, america was in the throes of a cold war and our great nation was viewed with cynicism. the peace corps showed the world the enduring values of peace, commitment to national service and an optimism that had been lost in the cold war and world war ii. under the masterful direction of sargent shriver, it grew to 1,500 volunteers. i was one of those early recruits. i found myself in peace corps training and found myself in medellin, colombia. i saw the grinding cycles of poverty that left so many men, women and children without hope. i committed then to work to end the culture of poverty. it is in no small part due to that experience in the peace corps that i am standing here in the congress. yes, i will yield. mr. dreier: i'd like to con gradge late my friend for his service in the peace corps. he not only served then but he continues to share that with us today and as we deal with countries around the world, the peace corps has been very important and i'm happy to recognize their 50th anniversary. mr. farr: thank you, mr. dreier. over the past 50 years, the peace corps has shown th
. we're america's solvency. everything you and i think of an america is up for grabs. this is a very, very sober moment for our country. i would ask you to, if you will, just pretend in your mind . pretend that you are a congressman or senator in the year 1850. in the year 1850 you might recall there was this 10,000-pound gorilla in the tent. people politically didn't quite know what to do with it. it was called the issue of slavery. and the way politics was working, you had the southern guys and the northern guys. and so the power was somewhat divided and the people that were congressmen and senators didn't know what to do with this huge gorilla which we call slavery. the issue they didn't know what to do with so they tried to step around it as best they could politically and say we will have one state come and be a free state. they will compromise instead of dealing with it head on the problem they had. 1852 there was a book, "uncle tom's cabin" and it increased the rhetoric and the issue of slavery. the gorilla is glowing and he's there and he's threatening. by 1857 the terrible d
>> if you recall it in the 1960's and 1970's, we were writing off urban america. >> with wall street's reemergence, new york city was really pulled into the global economy and became america's gateway to that economy and has really prospered ever since. >> watch the rest of the interview sunday night on c-span q&a. >> x, nouri clinton on military action in libya. then a discussion on ethics in government, then a forum from the consumer federation of america. >> secretary of state hillary clinton spoke earlier today about military action by the u.s. and its allies against the forces of libyan leader muammar gaddafi. earlier today, libyan government troops attacked the rebel capital in violation of a un cease-fire resolute -- resolution. she made these remarks in paris at a summit of leaders gathered to address the ongoing violence in the country. this is about 25 minutes. >> hello. before we begin, i want to sell a few words about warren christopher. he was a friend, and mentor, and truly a diplomat's diplomat. he served our country with such great distinction in so many capaci
served on the board of directors of the armenian assembly of america, the board of governors of the michigan design center, the detroit chapter of the armenian benevolent union and the seeds of peace. he was an associate in the founders society of the detroit institute of arts and was involved with the armenian library. edgar also founded the detroit chapter of the armenian american business council. edgar was named man of the year by the canadian armenian business council in 1995. in 2002, he was inducted into the international institute heritage hall of fame, and edgar was awarded the 2005 ellis island medal of honor. this prestigious award was to honor ancestral group who through struggle, sacrifice and success helped build this great nation. edgar deeply loved his community and his community loved him. always mindful of his humble roots, edgar always endeavored to better our world. he was a mentor to many and an avid patron of the arts, a philanthropist. he led companies to donate in excess of $70 million in goods and services to local charities. sadly on march 27, 2011,
this great nation, the united states of america is not going to become the united states of europe, not on our watch. thank you. [cheers and applause] . >> up next speaker is the former speaker, newt gingrich. [cheers and applause] he immersed himself in the study of history, in getting a master's in note -- history, getting a master's degree. he taught college for eight years. he was first elected to congress in 1978, where he served the six district -- sixth district. "the washington times" has called him "the indispensable leader." he got a man of the year in 1995. "meters make a possible. exceptionable leaders made them inevitable we do leaders make things possible -- leaders make things possible. exceptional leaders make them inevitable." under his leadership, congress passed welfare reform and the first balanced budget in a generation and the first tax cut in 16 years. a strong advocate of volunteerism, gingrich talks about the positive impact every individual can have. he has raised millions, including for habitat for humanity, cerebral palsy notep -- als --palsy, and others
defend the constitution of the united states of america. we commissioned a survey by public opinion strategies, one of the most respected polling organizations, and let me tell you what they found. in spite of all that talk about it being about the economy and jobs, and jobs and the economy were critical, they found that 32% of the entire electorate on november 2 was made up of conservative and evangelical christians who voted 70%-21% republican, and they were the booster rocket that drove the biggest landslide in a century, and will be the key to victory in 2012 and again. i know that sometimes when people go to washington they lose 20 i.q. points, and some have more despair than others. there is a tendency sometimes among the punditocracy to think that moral issues should be kept out of polite conversation. that social conservatives should ride in the back of the bus. my message to the national republican party tonight is simple -- if you turn your backs on the pro-family-pro-life consider freezing -- constituency, you will be consigned to permanent minority status. some have sugg
's lost matt damon, the president has lost america. the star blasting obama for "rolling over for wall street" nearly three years after the financial crisis. why has no one even been prosecuted for the open and bald frauds? a conversation after this. um su. aren't absorbed properly unless taken with food. he recommended citracal. it's different -- it's calcium citrate, so it can be absorbed with or without food. also available in small, easy-to-swallow petites. citracal. but now, to get it really cooking, you need a little website development. some transparent reporting, so you know it's working. online ads and 1-on-1 marketing consultation. yellowbook's got all that. yellowbook360 has a whole spectrum of tools. the perfect recipe for success. visit yellowbook360.com and go beyond yellow.  delicious gourmet of gravy. and she agrees. with fancy fest gravy lovers, your cat can enjoy the delicious, satisfying taste of gourmet gravy every day. fancy feast, the best ingredient is love. it's personal. i have diabetes. so i'm proud to manufacture the accu-chek aviva meters and test strips h
of dividends to shareholders or investment in the country and than never used in america. >> host: congressman greg walden is chairman of the commerce subcommittee on communication and technology. mike zapler with ""the politico"," thank you both. >> guest: thank you. >> coming up on c-span2, a portion of recent testimony by transportation secretary ray lahood on president obama's 2012 budget request. then more on transportation as we bring you live coverage of the american public transportation association's legislative conference. later, the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches. that'll be followed later by debate and a vote on a u.s. district court nomination as well as a procedural vote on a bill authorizing small business administration programs. >> author, poet and playright ishmael reid is on "in depth," live sunday, april 3rd. he's written over 25 books including "airing dirty laundry laundry," "another day at the front." join our three-hour conversation taking your phone calls, e-mails and tweets for ishmael reed, and watch previous "in depth "programs at booktv.org w
. we thank you that you gave us that ability to be able to take back the gavel. america thank you, new hampshire, for what you have done. give yourselves a hand. it is astounding. [applause] now i am here in new hampshire today for the purpose of asking you one more time, new hampshire. we need your help because you have set the course for the rest of the nation. you have set the standard for the rest of the nation. this was not an easy state but you did it. you cracked the knot in your able to send liberty, freedom- loving people to represent you. now we need to replicate that in all 50 states. this is our brief window of opportunity in 2012 to win the triple crown. the united states senate, running back up to 60 seats of liberty-loving conservatives. in fact, i would not mind saying -- maybe senators that has something in common. how do you like that? [applause] did anyone ask the important question this morning? tea, anyone? i would like to see some tea served in the united states senate, 60 c to of tea served in the united states senate in 2012, an overwhelming majority of t-loving
, read state and blue state. our listeners are equally distributed throughout every part of america, because of our unique network of local member stations. rooted in their communities, locally owned, operated, and staffed, these are citizens serving citizens. our listener is still a personal connection to what we do. not long ago, i was walking in reception with npr "morning edition" hosts, and we are radio, but as we mingled and introduced ourselves, i was struck by their reaction people had when they realized who he was. not merely a media celebrity, but someone with whom they feel a deep personal connection. and then of course, always the same joke, i wake up with you every morning. he is a good sport about it. he laughs each time like it is the first time he has ever heard it. and he is in cairo tonight so you will hear his reports from the region over the next several weeks. our listeners tell us they appreciate that our reporters report. and so do our hosts. our listeners tell us they come to us for the craftsmanship, the stability of our programming, and the range of opinion
american consumers in a very real way. welcome to "america live." i'm megyn kelly. the fighting is getting more intense in libya now. the president warned of possible military action now involving the u.s. >> the violence that's been taking place and perpetrated by the government in libya is unacceptable. i want to send a clear message to those that are around colonel qaddafi. it is their choice to make how they operate moving forward. they will be held accountable for whatever violence continues to take place there. megyn: leland vittert joins us streaming live. he is there on the ground. leland? >> reporter: we just got back from the frontlines where the rebels have been pinned down, not only by qaddafi ambush, but by qaddafi's air force. we were there and they have been able to move out. the problem for the rebels is not only can they not make any effort on the ground against qaddafi's forces, but there is not much they can do about his air force. >> there went another r.p.g. you can see it right down there. incredible amount of firepower. you can see they're trying to shoot down one of
steps, go to knowhow2go.org. what made america great is an independent, vigorous press. if a jerk burns a flag, america is not threatened. political speech is the heart of the first amendment. they're expressing their religious beliefs. now is the time to make justice a reality for all of god's children. captioning provided by the first amendment center, funded by the freedom forum. welcome to speaking freely, a weekly conversation about free expression and america. i'm ken paulson. today we'll look at the history of comic book censorship. our guests today include wendy pini of elfquest, joe quesada of marvel comics, and carmine infantino, the former publisher and president of d.c. comics. welcome to you all. (man) thank you. [applause] well, what a great lineup, and we've got folks with every possible perspective on comic books here. just by way of background, there is something called the comics code that is on comic books, most of the comic books i grew up reading-- many of which were illustrated by carmine-- had the comics code authority approval on it, which basically said this com
luxury cars, we make cadillacs. somewhere in america, a city comes to life. it moves effortlessly, breathes easily. it flows with clean water. it makes its skyline greener and its population healthier. all to become the kind of city people want to live and work in. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest questions. and the over sixty thousand people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> now, willie, you need to turn to donnie, just turn to donny and look at him in the face, say, donny, that's not okay. >> well, here's the problem. i don't feel that way. do we have the tape? this is just moments ago, an hour ago on "way too early." i was in the middle of a news story, a strange man came up behind me, on live television, and started massaging my back. >> you've got to tell him, that's not okay. >> you know what's weird, the tension's gone. >> you're looking at it and you're going, there's something right about that. >> not something, everything. >> men should be secure enough, they should be able to show affection for other men
>>> good morning, america. i'm bianna golodryga. >> and i'm dan harris. good morning. it is saturday, march 19th. this morning, breaking news. are these new pictures proof that moammar gadhafi is defying america? just hours after president obama told gadhafi to back down or face military actions. the rebels say gadhafi continues to attack. in fact, they say they just shot down one of his war planes. >>> state of emergency. frightening news from japan this morning. reports that their milk and food supply is now contaminated with radiation. and this morning, reports that the workers at the crippled nuclear plant in japan, are trying to start the cooling pumps to prevent a meltdown. >>> strange twist. police uncover what they say was a murder plot at this upscale yoga clothing store, in a posh washington, d.c. suburb. did this woman, murder her co-worker and then bind and gag herself so that she could claim to be a victim? >>> and hacked. who is hacking into celebrities' e-mail accounts? and leaking embarrassing photos and information? more than 50 stars have been hit so
for offering a resolution noting the many contributions that she made to america and express the condolences for her family. because, you see, mr. president, for we women before 1960geri was a force of nature, a powerhouse. she changed the face of politics. she changed the way women thought of themselves and what we believed we could accomplish. on july 11, 1984, when mo walter mondale called geri ferraro and sctd her to be his vice-presidential running mate, an amazing thing happened: they took down the men-only sign on the white house. they took down the men-only sign on the white house. for geri and all american women, there was no turning back, only going forward. america knows ger implete as a political phenomenon. i knew her as a dear friend and colleague. we served in the house together in the late-1970's and when she left in 1984 to run for vice president, i left in 1986 to run for the senate. we were among the early bird women in the house of representatives and as early birds, we weren't fraid to ruffle some feathers. we had some good times and passed some good legislation. it must
of america is business. two saturdays ago, i was at south by southwest, a very exciting activity that takes place in austin, texas, it not only promotes the live music industry, which is huge in austin, live music capital of the world, but in addition, it promotes entrepreneurship among people with new, great ideas. and those new, great idea people, all -- i talk to them, they are so excited. such great young people. many of them in the high tech industry but in all the industries. those young people sat there and told me the one thing you can do that would hurt us the most is tax stock options and put up regulations that would prevent me doing what i need to do in my project. so if the government will stay out of my way and if you won't impose taxes on the very source of investment money that i'm seeking as a new entrepreneur, if you don't do those two things and you stay out of the way, i've got an idea that can change this country. and many of them have just those ideas. some of the things we have now like facebook, those things like they made a movie about and all that stuff, all that w
on "the washington post," a study on sex in america, study finds abstinence on rise in teens, early 20s. i've been saying for some time and some time looking at my kids and their friends over the past few years -- >> right. >> i've noticed a, in the age of pornography where a kid who is 9 or 10 is exposed to stuff we weren't exposed to until we were in college or even later, a more conservative generation regarding sex. and here it says the number of teens and people in the early 20s who remain abstinent goes well into the early -- it goes close to a third, mike barnicle. this is a dramatic shift. our youth are becoming more conservative when it comes to abstinence and sex. i think it's a reaction to all those images they're bombarded with at an early age. >> i think part of it, i think you put your finger on part of it, is the unbelievable access that kids have, everyone has, to stuff on the internet from the age of 8, 9, 10 years of age. i am the wrong guy to talk to about this, joe. i was raised with a deep belief and taught that sex is more dangerous than the third rail. >> right. >> j
. and three times i will ask, god, please, god, please, god, please continue to bless america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee, mr. cohen, for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in opposition to chairman upton's dirty air act. in 2007, the supreme court issued the massachusetts vs. e.p.a. decision directing the e.p.a. to examine greenhouse gas emissions and their impact on the public health. e.p.a. conducted a highly credible peered review scientific analysis under the bush e.p.a. and the obama e.p.a. this was not a political analysis. it was a scientific analysis. but that has not stopped the chairman from trying to legislativively undermine scientific fact. according to the e.p.a., president nixon's clean air act will prevent 230,000 premature deaths and result in $2 trillion in economic benefits in 2020. but chairman upton has decided with much help from corporate polluters, lobbyists that the fiscal and physical well-being of the american people are less important than big oil's import
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., march 17, 2011. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. mcconnell: mr. president? the presiding officer: the republican leader is recognized. mr. mcconnell: it was a great honor to have thad austin of murfreesboro, tennessee, provide the opening prayer this morning. i -- i thank him for his wise words. i first met the reverend austin as an alma mater at the university in willmore, kentucky, when i visited there in 2007. it is to engage the world and serve the world through public service. our guest chaplain has pursued that mission with great success. maybe it is a family calling.
about tightening the belt, but nobody talks about the companies in america tightening their belts. if we went back to a flat tax, no tax break, no tax shelters, everyone pays 10%, that would help our economy, the american families, and it would let big business pay what they should pay. guest: here is one of the big issues we are dealing with that. people at oil companies are making a lot of money. we are dealing with a major energy crunch right now. people can look at oil companies and say, they have record profits and we have record high prices. the fact is, we are dealing with record high prices in oil. if we could add energy from our own country, we could manage that and it would be different. fluctuations from overseas would not still be occurring, at this point. people also talk about oil companies getting tax breaks. it is that ability to write off their business expenses. it is the same as other companies. people say that they are larger and these small companies, but they are, they are larger businesses. people want to pick on that. what would they do if they pulled that out? th
, everybody. "america live" starts right now. megyn: thanks, guys. this is a fox news alert, breaking right now. wisconsin's capital is in lockdown. assembly members cannot get into the chamber to vote on a bill concerning state worker contracts because the protesters are literally blocking the doors. here's one lawmaker losing his temper with the chaos in the capital. >> let us do our jobs! this is america! this is america! this is america! let us do our jobs! stop the tricks! it's enough! enough is enough! let us do our jobs! megyn: wow. let us do our jobs. this is america. police dragging protesters by force from the capital. they've been blocking lawmakers. the bill went through last night and now goes to the assembly, but not if these protesters have anything to say about it. the department of justice in wisconsin is investigating email threats to the lives of republican state senators who did push through that controversial measure last night. death threats described as "several of them" against "a number of lawmakers" in response to what it did there. democrats that fled the state la
cutting short his tour of latin america amid criticism of his leadership on libya and now heading back to washington two hours earlier than planned and holding a conference call with his national security team before departing. speaking in el salvador yesterday, obama pushed back against criticism of the high cost of war which some analystings predict could cost the western coalition more than $1 billion if the operation drags on for more than a couple of months. >> we will continue to provide details to the american people about the costs of this operation. but because it is limited in time, scope, with a well-defined mission, we are confident that this is something we can budget as part of our overall operations. events happen around the world in which the united states with our unique capabilities has to respond. as the leader in the world community. in benghazi, city of 700,000 people, you had the prospect of gadhafi's forces carrying out his orders to show no mercy. for us to be able to structure something where we bring our unique capabilities to bear, to fulfill a mission that i
they wrote of this is my house. it's about people from central america and in texas they call them otm, other than mexicans. [laughter] and this is what we have within our own experiences of people outside our experience don't have it's humorous in some ways it's really sad in most ways and so i went on to close with this issue. those of us who had this immigrant background, when we came to congress, we -- if we don't forget we are and where we come from, we can take our history and background and turn that into policy to make the policy of more precise, more focused and humane. because we should know where we come from. i talked about asians in general. and touched upon latinos. we have the congressional black caucus, the congressional hispanic caucus and cpac. it's come to the surface because we understand now even though slavery was not an immigration issue its and as and humane as it was african-americans were brought here, not integrated, but more recently in this history of this country we have immigrants from columbia, 25% of the popular dvd population our afro columbia and the central
. later, a form from the consumer federation of america. president obama is currently on a four day visit of and plan american country. he will deliver a speech on rio de janeiro on u.s. and latin american relations. tuesday and wednesday he is in el salvador, where he will meet with the president there, before returning to washington. continuing coverage of his trip here on the c-span network. the ford museum recently held its first symposium on ethics in america. they look at how they handle ethical issues. ford talks about how his father dealt with the dilemma at watergate. it will talk about the the leaking information to reporters. this is one hour and 20 minutes. >> from a teenager in the white house to a most interesting career. sometimes, he has been a cowboy, a businessman, corporate spokesperson, and motivational speaker too many audiences. when gerald ford was sworn in as the 38th president of the united states, steve and his three siblings steadily went from the kids down the block to the only kid on the block on the 1600 pennsylvania avenue. this life was intense and not alwa
? david and charles koch, probably the most aggressive and prolific right-wing activists in america today, individually they are each tied for 18th richest man in the world are. and their combined fortune would rank them at number 4, right behind carlos slim, bill gates, and warren buffett. this isn't them moving up in the ranks. they would have been fourth in the world last year, too. but just in the past year, good news, david and charles koch saw their wealth increase by $9 billion in one year. that's how much it went up. and remember, they don't really work. they inherited an oil and chemical company from their papa. but they made $9 billion in the past year doing the hard work of inheriting something. so number 1, carlos slim. number 2, bill gates. number 3, warren buffett. number 4, the combined wealth of the koch brothers. but this list turned out to also be good news for those of us here at "the rachel maddow show" because coming in at number 7 this year was susie jones, kent jones's mom. number 7 on the billionaires list this year. she's a retired kindergarten teacher from missou
. but with just about every republican in every corner of america saying that evil obamacare is worse than doing nothing. president obama has just responded to those allegations in effect by saying, oh, yeah? oh, yeah? we are still waiting on the republican come back to that. a fight being widely misreported in the beltway media. ezra klein joins us next. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. and here's what we did today in homes all across america: we created the electricity that powered the alarm clocks and brewed the coffee. we heated the bathwater and gave kelly a cleaner ride to school. cooked the cube steaks and steamed the veggies. entertained dad, and mom, and a neighbor or two. kept watch on the house when they slept. and tomorrow we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. >>> the single most republican place in the country, the single reddest state there is in this country has produced one of the most interesting political fights that there
. barack obama was born in america. barack obama is a christian who accepted jesus christ as his personal savior. >> and lets move on. >> barack obama said that. >> i think first of all it's more indicative of the sad state of american politics. number one. and number two, i think it is destructive to the republicans. >> it is. >> i'm out there all the time saying these guys told us they'd do something about jobs. they've been on their job since early january. we've had about abortion, birthing, we've heard about this, we've heard about that. we heard nothing about jobs. they should be talking about one thing. >> let's go back to what else mike said. >> all right. >> listen, i simply refuse to pick a fight. let's bring in willie really quickly. willie, you've been part of the happy woody's roundup over the past three or four years. we love mike. but if my mother said this, i would say something about my mother. >> when we started this in 2007 -- by the way, my mother says stuff like this all the time. i pick up the phone and call her and say, ma, stop it! >> in 2007 when we started i was
. then you have to decide is that a person you trust, at a time when america clearly needs to have veryrtundamental challenges. >> greta: you have now converted to catholicism, when and why? >> it was a long process. calista was born into a catholic church and very devout. she sings in the choir as a spouse i went in a supportive way. over time, being there, participating, experiencing the mass, i tell people it wasn't so much that i converted as it was that i god wallly became catholic and one morning realized what happened. i find it a -- nurturing and comforting experience ands that made me feel more at peace than any other time in my life. >> greta: more with newt gingrich. straight ahead, you just heard from newt gingrich. do not go away. there are four more. hear from the other four possible presidential contenders in iowa. rick santorum is next. also admit, you have been waiting for this. more breaking news about charlie sheen. first his tv show was put on hiatus. then his children were taken away. now a bigger bombshell. we'll tell you what is going on with charlie sheen, stay tun
and politicians need that have been and the important thing is this is america's city a doherty has a stake in the city, every becomes here, belongs them and this comes about. >> one of the things we do in the book there is very strange thing for example, the lincoln conspirators were hung in the famous photograph is now the place in which garfield was shot on his way back to the williams college reunion waiting for the building on the mall. a little tiny markers about as big as a trustee that says this is where the president was shot, so part of this is discovering this league history of the city and the and back to amazing things in the civil war. there's part of washington where abraham lincoln there's a battle in washington that the confederate troops are approaching the city and abraham lincoln stands up and they shoot at him and somebody says mr. president, and they pull him down. one of the problems of the battle of fort stevens is have the soldiers had to keep the citizens sightseers back from getting killed. this wildness that was here all along and was sort of limestone do
at the outset of our military operations. i said that america's role would be limited, that we would not put ground troops into libya, that we would focus our unique capabilities on the front end of the operation, and that we would transfer responsibility to our allies and partners. tonight, we are fulfilling that pledge. our most effective alliance, nato, has taken command of the enforcement of the arms embargo and the no-fly zone. last night, nato decided to take on the additional responsibility of protecting libyan civilians. this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners, and i am fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader, nato base coalition, the risks and cost
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> state of emergency. areas hard-hit by tornadoes, as the waterlogged northeast braces for more rain later today. >>> new outrage in wisconsin. after three weeks of protests, lawmakers plan to strip union rights. >>> rich and famous. the new list of america's billionaires. mark zuckerberg's fortune triples. but he's not the youngest anymore. >>> good morning. it is another sopping wet day here in the northeast, where rivers are dangerously swollen from last week's storm. >> drenching rain is expected to come down all day long, from the mid-atlantic states here in new york. and new jersey is expected to bare the brunt of it. >> this is part of the same system that just slammed the deep south with as many as two dozen twisters. more, now, from emily schmidt. >> reporter: storm chasers knew they were watching something big develop in the southeast. >> there's the rotation. >> you can see the swell. >> that one's nasty. >> reporter: storm chasers were right. winds whipped into tornadoes near mobile, alabama. tearing off a gas station awn
>>> good morning, america. >> there's a tornado, right there. get in the school. >> running for cover. a tornado chases down high school children. their moment of terror, caught on tape. >>> air traffic snooze. an air controller admits dozing off. this morning, drastic action at airports across this country. >>> chris brown breaks his silence, expressing regret over his backstage blowup here at "gma." >> i want to apologize to anybody who was startled in the office. anybody who was offended. >> but he didn't stop there. we'll have all the reaction and more details on what really happened. >>> and guilty as charged. this dog knew she was headed to the dog house. >> let's see your face. oh, my goodness. denver, you didn't. >> this morning, denver the dog is here. it's a "gma" exclusive. her first interview right here. >>> oh, denver. don't feel that bad. we've all had our tail between our legs at one point, right? >> at least she's coming out of the penalty to be with us. good morning, america. we have david muir with us, as george continues to take time off. you know what we'
call the duck. it said, america now up for grabs, and it was referring to this concert that the rolling stones had in december of 1969. and this was supposed to have been a triumphant affair. they appeared with carlos santana and the jefferson airplane, and they had a hard time sort of finding a venue for this show at the last minute, so they did it at altamont speedway. and it turned out to be a disaster. thousands of people sort of clamored on top of each other to get close to the stage. someone had the bright idea of hiring the hell's angels motorcycle gang to do security, and they paid them, allegedly, with a truckload of beer. it was a really violent scene, so the hell's angels were brutalizing and beating up spectators and probably would have been less violent if rolling stones had played a little earlier. the concert was being filmed for a documentary called "give me shelter," which you probably are familiar with. anyhow, mick jagger was reluctant to play until it was dark because he thought it he wd look better under the stage lights. it was just a violent, ugly scene, and the r
's like the argument about america that is at the heart of this. now he can argue that progressives and i do come from the senate, i do work for the center of american progress, have an extra constitutional vision of the system of laws, constitutional decision-making that argued that we have a living constitution that should to some degree acknowledge the realities of the world we live in today, and that the reason why the constitution speaks in broader language and it's not as restrictive and statute because our founders recognized that they could not determine what america would be 200, 250, 300 years from the time that a libyan. and so that those who argued for a broader constitutional perspective obviously limited by the text, and having some strong adheres to the text, but still to the degree that we recognize the fact the way people live is not the vision that is not respectful of liberty. we define liberty, we may have a different vision of what that liberty means. for example, i myself personally believe that it is not respectful of someone's liberty interests that we argue that w
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